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Full text of "The Tattler"

THE TATTLER 



19 




67 



a 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 
WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 




Editorial 





■ 




• - Jf ^>-T 



Williamsburg High School offers a good balance 
of educational and extracurricular interests . 
The student at Williamsburg is offered an ex- 
cellent educational preparation for life . The 
small enrollment of the school enables each 
student to study in an intimate educational cli- 
mate, for Williamsburg High School places 
much importance on personal contact between 
student and teacher. Each student at Williams- 
burg is, above all, an individual. 

The diversified activities in which students 
may participate make the school unique for 
its size. The extracurricular program offers 
everything from debating to golf. A feeling of 
"school spirit" contributes to the atmosphere 
of the school. This feeling of loyalty to the 
school is shown by participation in school 
events, such as the Student Council carwash, 
and vigorous support of school athletic teams. 
An outsider would be conscious of a strong 
feeling of school loyalty if he were to attend a 
basketball game and hear the students cheering, 
loudly when victorious, more quietly when the 
game is lost. Pride in the school and in our 
accomplishments is an important factor in 
unifying Williamsburg High School. 

R . L. E . 
2 P.O.W. 



Contents 




Dedication 


4 


The Students 


5 


Organizations 


19 


individuals 


37 


Seniors 


43 


Faculty 


55 


Advertising 


58 




43 



Dedication 




A concerned person is rare. Rarer still is a man who has the capacity 
and the determination to concern himself with the ultimate welfare of 
his fellow men. We are dedicating our yearbook to a person who has 
never been too busy or too aloof to listen, to encourage, and to under- 
stand, a person who has tried to focus our minds on the true meaning of 
life, rather than its trivial aspects. 

Students admire and strive to emulate a person who is not tied to his 
textbook. In the classroom this man refused to restrict himself to any 
curriculum. He is a teacher in the purest sense of the word, because he 
set as his goal the enlightenment of each of his pupils. 



If it is true that the real teacher is, at heart, an eternally inquisitive 
student, then this man qualifies. His refreshing candor and selfless 
devotion to his work has impressed each of us in a very person;) 1 way 
With great admiration and deep appreciation we, the Class of L967, 
dedicate our yearbook to Mr. Herbert Montebello. 



THE STUDENTS 






J0\ 




Curriculum Prepares Student 




The attorney for the prosecution gives up in despair as the attorney for the defense talks to the jury in the 
business law class mock trial. 




Typing students learn the proper form for business letters. 




Mr. Montebello finds humor in 
the intricacies of the United 
States tax system. 



for Successful Life after Graduation 



I The curriculum at Williamsburg High School is divided into three parts . Students may 
I pursue a college course, a general course, or a business course. All students study 
English, but there the similarity ends. The college course offers preparation in aca- 
demic subjects for the individual who intends to further his education in a two or four- 
] year college. Courses in science, college preparatory mathematics, foreign languages, 
I and history provide the college-bound individual with a strong foundation for continued 
I study. 

I The general course provides a good education for the individual who is not interested 
in going on to college and does not aspire to a business career. Subjects such as gen- 
eral mathematics, world history, and economic geography give the student a general 

I knowledge of the world around him. 

The business course is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills nec- 
essary to obtain clerical positions in business or government offices. Typing, book- 
l keeping, and general business classes are balanced by courses in business law, 
economics, and problems of democracy to provide the commercial student with a 
well-rounded education. 

There are several highlights in the business curriculum. This year the business law 
class created a life-like court case and held a mock trial. Through this practical 
application of the principles learned in class, business law became much more mean- 
ingful to the students. Each year the problems of democracy class fills out practice 
income-tax forms to prepare for life as tax-paying citizens. 

The curriculum at Williamsburg offers courses to suit the needs of each individual, 
and the faculty places great emphasis on adequately preparing each student for a 
successful life after graduation. 



Seniors studying English literature examine book on the Classicists. 




43 



The Students As Participants 




Freshmen Pay Seniors Due Respect 



The year wouldn't be com- 
plete without the traditional 
Freshman Initiation . After 
attending classes for half a 
day in an assortment of 
weird costumes, the fresh- 
men must suffer the 
humility of attending the 
Freshman Reception Dance. 
This year's entertainment 
was quite amusing. The 
audience was treated to a 
very original ballet executed 
by a lithe freshmen boy, and 
a charming rendition of "I'm 
a Little Teapot" . There 
were several other stunts 
devised by the ingenious 
seniors, among these a re- 
lay race, won by the fresh- 
man who could roll limburger 
cheese with his nose the 
fastest, and a blindfolded 
jello -eating contest . The 
evening ended with a dance . 




4D 



Service Groups Hel 



The Student Guides, Library Aides, and Audio-visual Aides make up the service 
groups at Williamsburg High School. These groups are frequently overlooked, even 
though their jobs are not only useful, but also essential to the proper functioning of 
our school. 






The Library Aides consist of students who devote every Wednesday to keeping the li- 
brary in order. They perform such tasks as making overdue book lists, entering 
books and magazines, keeping the shelves straightened, and moving books to provide 
more space. Without their help, maintaining an efficient library available for the 
whole student body would be much more difficult. 

The Student Guides form a group of thirteen junior and senior boys stationed in the 
halls of the high school between class periods. Here they direct traffic and deal with 
any problems which might arise involving student behavior. The guides are also on 
duty in the Anne T. Dumphy School at lunch and at assemblies to eliminate traffic 
jams in the halls. Although Mr. Tonet is in charge of the group, the student guides 
actually carry out their duties independently- -a good example of student responsibility. '■ 







Audio-visual Aides are: FIRST ROW: James O'Brien, 
James Brisbois. SECOND ROW: Scott Davidson, 
Mark Harry, Alan Deyette, Richard Loomis. 




The Audio-visual Aides also work inde- 
pendently, although Mr. Knight meets with 
the group in the fall to train new members 
or introduce new equipment. The aides 
are available throughout the school year 
to run any of the nine pieces of equipment 
which the school owns, including two 
movie projectors, two film strip projec- 
tors, two record players, a tape recorder, 
an overhead" projector, and an opaque 
projector. Also, the aides are trained in 
the use of the Polaroid camera. The 
Audio-visual Aides play an obviously im- 
portant part in school life. 



Each member of these three 
groups which serve the student 
body during the school year 
ought to be congratulated for 
contributing much time and 
energy, with no other reward 
than the personal satisfaction of 
a job well done. 



Library Aides are: SEATED: Robert Ames, Barbara Holroyd, 
Lucille Russell. STANDING: Alan Loughnan, William Brown. 



10 



:hool to Function Properly 




FIRST ROW: Robert Wilson, James Wells, Curtis Mercier, Peter Gorham. SECOND ROW: Ed- 
ward McCabe, Douglas Durham, Wayne Beebe, Richard Hillenbrand, Edgar Judd, Lawrence 
West, Peter Montague, David Dewey. 



mmmmmmesm 





$ 



Library Aide Lucille Russell straightens up 
the book shelves. 



Tuck in your shirt ! 



11 



Junior Prom Is Well Attended 




Would you believe a purple castle? 








The queen is crowned. 




"Camelot" was the theme of our Junior Prom. After 
weeks of hard work, the decoration committee trans- 
formed the gymnasium into a medieval castle, complete 
with a moat and drawbridge. Colorful battle shields 
and two lovely damsels in medieval dress added atmo- 
sphere. The crowning of the queen was an eagerly 
awaited event. Barbara Turner was chosen to reign, 
having in her court Mary Ann Mocheski, Lynn Tornow, 
Jane Parsons, and Dorothy Sylvester. 



12 



Latin Students Hold Roman Banquet 





Modern Romans await refreshments. 



Who will mix the drinks? 




Paul gives the roll call. 



The Latin Banquet of 1966 was held 
last spring with all the splendor of 
ancient Rome . The feast was dedicated 
to Apollo, the god of the sun. The 
evening was started with a sumptuous 
meal of assorted meats, fruits, and 
vegetables. After this, the king, Alan 
Go lash, and the queen, Connie Sara- 
fin, were crowned. Then, with Paul 
Howes, the master of ceremonies, 
presiding, the bloody gladiator fights 
and chariot races were staged by the 
freshman students. 



0\ 




13 



Basketball Players and Cheerleader 




The participation of the basketball players and cheerleaders typifies the spirit which 
keeps our school alive. The boys on the basketball team learn good sportsmanship as 
well as good basketball techniques during the long hours of after- school practice. The 
cheerleaders also devote much of their own time after school to learn the cheers, 
jumps, and pompon routines which have become so much a part of our basketball 
games. The hard work of the players and cheerleaders does not go unappreciated, 
however, for there is a keen interest in basketball in Williamsburg and surrounding 
towns. The Bantams enjoy the enthusiastic support of the adult community as well as 
the student body. 



One of the most outstanding participants in our school is William Graves. Graves, 
captain of the varsity basketball team, reached the one thousand point goal sought by 
high school athletes who participate in basketball. Graves is the third player in the 
history of the school to reach this goal. He was given the ball with which he scored 
the one-thousandth point. He will also receive a plaque in honor of his achievement. 




14 



1/pify Spirit of Participation at Williamsburg 




The Burgy beauty contest was a highlight of the pep rally. 



William Graves was given the basketball with which he scored his one -thousandth point. 




D 



15 



Dramatics Club Presents 'Christopher Bean" 



Work and cooperation between both students and teachers led to a 
fine presentation of THE LATE CHRISTOPHER BEAN, by Sidney 
Howard. Assisted by Mrs . Gervais, Mrs. Halberstadt directed 
this comedy. She also advised the Props Committee and the Make- 
up Committee, both of whom did a wonderful job. Aided by her 
committee, Mrs. Curtis found costumes of the 1930's. making the 
play seem very realistic. Mrs. Bart was in charge of publicity. 
Even though the committees are essential, the production would 
have been nothing without the cast, who braved the staring faces 
of the audience and actually made the play a good one. 




All actors must reht 




Art dealer tries to hood\sink Dr. Haggett. 




Ik- 



/ 




Abby serves breakfast. 



Makeup committee created 1930 hair 
styles. 



16 





Confusion reigns in the dressing room. 




Makeup committee works diligently. 





Mrs. Halberstadt is rewarded 
for her patience. 



The stage crew is the backbone of any 
production. 



17 



Basketball Banquet Honors Players and Cheerleaders 

On April 8, 1967, the seven- 
teenth annual Basketball Ban- 
quet was held in the Anne T. 
Dunphy cafeteria. Teachers, 
parents, friends, and players 
all enjoyed a wonderful meal. 
After the meal everyone 
laughed through the presenta- 
tion of "gag" gifts by the boys 
and girls basketball teams to 
each other, and then enjoyed 
the presentation of trophies 
and awards . 

Marilyn Menard, Sylvia Culver, 
Margaret Clark, Carla Swanda, 
Gloria Rapalee, Barbara Kajka, 
and Judith Banister, senior bas- 
ketball players, were awarded 
trophies, and senior manager, 
Kathleen Bisbee received a 
plaque. 

Senior boys honored this year 
were Richard Hillenbrand, 
Wayne Beebe, Ahmed Sofi, and 
Michael Eaton. Richard Hillen- 
brand and Robert Wilson were 
awarded plaques for placing 
first and second respectively 
in the foul shooting playoff, 
and Richard Hillenbrand will 
also have his name inscribed on the W. Malcolm Heath Memorial Plaque for having 
the best foul shooting average during the season. For the first time, senior cheer- 
leaders were awarded trophies. Receiving cheering trophies were Kate Frost, 
Barbara Turner, and Lynda Childs . Connie Sarafin was named captain of next 
year's cheering squad. 




Ahmed Sofi received an auto- 
graphed basketball to take back 
to Morocco with him. 



"I hope my wife likes 
dogs." 




Coach Tonet didn't quite know what to do 
with his flowered earplugs. 




18 



The Students in Organizations 




Organizations 
play an important 
part in our school, 
from enforcing 

a student dress 
code to 
encouraging 
scholarship in 
others. 



01 



19 



Student Council Initiates Many Changes 







SEATED: FIRST ROW: Curtis Mercier, Timothy Daggett, Herbert Hale, 
Sylvia Culver, Joan Gagnon, Harold Warner, Carlotta Rustemeyer. SECOND 
ROW: David Dewey, Barbara Turner, Linda Munson. STANDING: Ronald 
Bachand, Gilbert Christopher, James Brown, Alfred Cone, Edward Parsons. 




The Student Council serves as a vital link 
between the student body and the faculty. 
This year's council has been particularly 
successful in providing the communication 
necessary to form this link. Students are 
now well -informed of council activities 
because the minutes of all meetings are 
posted on the bulletin boards. Student 
suggestions have precipitated many inno- 
vations in school policy. This year's 
council presented to the administration a 
new, more liberal dress code. The Stu- 
dent Council made it possible for hunters 
with their parents' permission to have one 
day off from school during deer season. 
Accomplishments such as these character- 
ize the L966-1967 Student Council. 






Interested students ex imine new rules brought 
about by Student Council action. 



20 



Foreign Aid Program Is Debate Topic 




STANDING: Cynthia Davidson, Gilbert Christopher, Herber Hale, Curtis Mercier. SEATED: 
Betsy Feiker, James Edwards, Edward Parsons, Jonathan Montague. 




v jm 




[Debater Cindy Davidson examines material on this year's 
debate topic. 



The Debate Team, under the direction 
of Mr. Herbert Montebello, has taken 
part in several debate tournaments 
this year. With six novice debaters 
and only two varsity, the team is 
slightly hampered by inexperience. 
However, the members have done a 
great deal of research to prepare 
themselves to debate this year's topic: 
Resolved: That the foreign aid program 
of the United States should be limited 
to non-military assistance. 



P 



21 



National Honor Society Seeks To Promote Scholarship 




SEATED: Kathleen Bisbee, Linda Munson, Curtis Mercier, Cory Stout, Judith Banister, and Rebecca 
Ells. STANDING: Marsha Skwira, Gloria Rapalee, Lucille Russell, Kathleen Frost. 



The Williamsburg Chapter of the National Honor Society was 
organized in 1965. The object of this society is to create an 
enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render 
service, to promote worthy leadership, and to encourage the 
development of character in all students of Williamsburg High 
School. Membership in the Chapter is based upon Scholarship, 
Service, Leadership, and Character. A student is selected to 
become a member of the National Honor Society in his junior 
year if he has achieved an average of eighty-five or better after 
two and one-half years and if he has displayed the other three 
qualities. Membership is provisional; the student must maintain 
an eighty-five average. This year's society is planning its sec- 
ond book sale. The proceeds will be used to present a scholar- 
ship to a deserving senior at graduation. 



22 



Glee Club Presents H.M.S. PINAFORE 




FIRST ROW: Judith Connell, Joanne Cumm. SECOND ROW: Michael Harry, Brian Rapalee. 
THIRD ROW: Hans Weit. FOURTH ROW: Cynthia Davidson, Edward Parsons. FIFTH ROW: 
Timothy Daggett, Paul Howes. 



Last year under a new music instructor, Mrs. Roberta Cowell, 
the Glee Club was reorganized into the after school chorus. The 
music group, which had previously met during school time for a 
regular period on Friday, now meets twice a week for an hour 
and a half after school. The chorus is made up of about forty 
members who meet to enjoy themselves and perform to entertain 
others. The group has sung at various assemblies, for the 
Mother's Club, and at senior graduation. But their major en- 
deavor was to perform the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, H.M.S. 
PINAFORE. This libretto, consisting of two acts, is not only a 
love story, but also a spoof on the British Navy. As in most 
Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, true love finds a way, and all 
live "happily ever after." The main characters were portrayed 
by Hans Weit, Cynthia Davidson, Edward Parsons, Joanne Cumm, 
Michael Harry, Brian Rapalee, Judy Connell, Timothy Daggett, 
and Paul Howes . 







23 



Tattler and Press Club Members Work Diligentl 




Deadlines must be met. 




Students devote much time to the Tattler. 




Many students read and enjoy the Tat- 
tler, but few of them actually under- 
stand the methods used in putting it 
together. Because of the limited budget 
with which the staff works, most of the 
pictures used in the yearbook are taken 
by the student photographers . Students 
donate their own time to write articles 
for the various divisions of the book. 
The articles are then proofread. Dur- 
ing study halls, members of the staff 
plan the page layouts, using the 
articles and pictures . Multiples of 
eight of these sheets have to be sent 
to the printer by certain dates . To 
the staff, it seems that everything falls 
due all of a sudden, and there is much 
chaos in the Tattler office on the day 
before a deadline . However, with the 
help and guidance of the advisor, Mrs. 
Marie Packard, all work is completed 
and deadlines are met . 

The Press Club serves a very import- 
ant purpose at Williamsburg High 
School . This literary group, led by 
Mrs. Marjorie McKusick, is respon- 
sible for the school news columns 
which appear in the DAILY HAMPSHIRE 
GAZETTE. All class secretaries and 
other interested students are assigned 
to cover important school functions, 
and Press Club members take turns 
combining these stories into interest- 
ing newspaper articles . Through the 
efforts of this organization, communi- 
cation is maintained between the school 
and surrounding communities . 



Michael Eaton keeps up on school news. 



24 



throughout the School Year 




Members of the Press Club are Donald Gray, Herbert Hale, Susan Sylvester, Sylvia 
Culver, Joanne Lawler, and Paula Pavelcysk. 




D 



Members of the Tattler staff are: FIRST ROW: Sylvia Culver, Gloria Rapalee, Kath- 
leen Frost, Rebecca Ells, Kathleen Bisbee. SECOND ROW: Marsha Skwira, Barbara 
Turner, Marilyn Menard, Lucille Russell, Linda Munson. THIRD ROW: Philip Webb, 
Edward McCabe, Douglas Ferrante, Edgar Judd, Douglas Durham, Peter Montague, 
Curtis Mercier. 



25 



Varsity Girls End Season with I 3-2 Record 




GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL SCOR 



FIRST ROW: Denise Bickford, Manager; Marilyn Menard, Co-captain; Sylvia 
Culver, Co-captain; Kathleen Bisbee, Manager. SECOND ROW: Peggy Clark, 
Barbara Kajka, Judith Banister, Carla Swanda. THIRD ROW: Gloria Rapalee, 
Eileen Gromelski, Dawn Ford, Donna Thackeray, Gloria Bushee, Jean 
Rustemeyer. 



The 1966-67 girls basketball team under 
Coach Evelyn Kmit ended the season with a 
fabulous record of thirteen wins and two 
losses. Speed, height, teamwork, and good 
coaching proved to be the greatest assets to 
this year's team, as was shown in games 
against our most difficult rivals, St. Mi- 
chael's and Amherst. 

For a second year the Burgy girls were 
invited to participate in the Western Massa- 
chusetts Girls Tournament. The first game 
was a victory against Smith Academy whom 
they had already played during the season. 
The team went into the semi-finals against 
Pioneer, but was defeated in a well-played 
game. 

This year graduation will take seven play- 
ers: four forwards, Marilyn Menard, Peggy 
Clark, Carla Swanda, and Gloria Rapalee; 
and three guards, Sylvia Culver, Barbara 
Kajkn, and Judith Banister. With their ex- 
perience the juniors should do well in next 
year's season. 




Williams 


burg 


Oppone 


27 


Chester 


8 


30 


Gateway 


20 


33 


Gateway 


25 


29 


Smith Academy 


31 


32 


Northampton 


26 


25 


Hopkins 


7 


16 


St. Michael's 


33 


23 


Amherst 


13 


22 


Smith Academy 


20 
11 


26 


St. Michael's 


35 


Chester 


31 


38 


Hopkins 


10 


36 


Turners Falls 


19 


35 


Northampton 


27 


34 


Amherst 
TOURNAMENT 


27 


27 


Smith Academy 


20 


24 


Pioneer 


30 



26 



Junior Varsity Girls Have a Remarkable Season 




FIRST ROW: Joyce Pash, Joy Nietsche, Barbara Sarafin, Jean Pomeroy, Theresa Vayda, Susan Ingellis, Jean 
Clark. SECOND ROW: Lianne Cone, Judith Connell, Jo-Ann Healy, Debra Beebe, Sandra Graves, Miriam 
Graves, Dale Dextraze, Mary Lou Sanderson, Diane Dextraze, Carol Jenkins, Manager. 




1 3 



NIOR VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 




SCORES 




lliamsburg 


Opponent 


26 


Smith Academy 


10 


17 


Northampton 


1 


26 


Hopkins 


4 


19 


St. Michael's 


9 


17 


Amherst 


15 


12 


Smith Academy 


5 


15 


St. Michael's ' 


12 


26 


Hopkins 


10 


23 


Turners Falls 


11 


17 


Northampton 


5 


17 


Amherst 


20 



This year the girls' Junior Varsity basket- 
ball team, with Mrs. Evelyn Kmit coach- 
ing, enjoyed a very successful season, 
winning ten games and losing only one. 

The freshmen and sophomores did an ex- 
cellent job, exhibiting keen competition, 
good teamwork and sportsmanship. Having 
junior high girls playing to gain experience 
proves a valuable asset to subsequent 
teams . Since they demonstrated enough 
skill this year to keep up with the older 
girls, we are confident that in the next 
few years they will be very valuable to our 
team. 



27 



Cross Country Team Enj. 



The cross country team enjoyed its best season since 1961 despite a rather poor sta] 
finishing with a 7-3 overall mark. In league competition a 5-3 record resulted in a 
third place tie with Holyoke in the Northern Division. After winning an independent 
meet at Belchertown 19-44. the team lost three successive meets to the strongest 
teams in the Northern Division before shutting out Frontier Regional. The team then 
went on to win six dual meets in a row, including another shoutout over Belchertown 
and a rewarding 21-37 victory over arch -rival Northampton. Those two shoutouts we] 
the first in cross country history at Williamsburg High School. 

In the Western Massachusetts Regional Meet at the University of Massachusetts, Burg 
took some sting out of its early season defeats, finishing in a third place tie with Tun 
ers Falls, the best showing for Burgy in the four year history of the meet. Warren 
Messeck and Bill Graves both won silver medals for the second year in a row, and 
placed third and seventeenth respectively. 

For the first time in school history an athletic team participated in state competition 
as Warren Messeck and Bill Graves placed sixth and forty-seventh respectively in a 
field of 188 runners in Class E in the State Cross Country meet in Boston. It is hoped 
that continued interest and improvement will allow the entire team to participate in 
this meet. 



Consistant point winners in dual meet competition were Warren Messeck, who was 9- 
individually for the season, Bill Graves, Dave Graves, Jim Taylor, and Pete Gorham 
Only Bill Graves and Ahmed Sofi of Morocco won't be returning next year, which gives 1 
the team an excellent outlook for 1967 provided that the anticipated improvement of 
the JV squad becomes a reality. 



II 






«• 



\n 




The team relaxes after an exciting meet. 



'"» ■/ 






FIRST ROW: Peter Hale, Richard Hutchins, 
David McCutcheon, Brian Rapalee, Philip 
Graves, SECOND ROW: Alan Golash, Ah- 
med Sofi, James Taylor, William Graves, 
and David Graves. Absent were Peter Gor- 
ham, Donald Gray, John Dufresne, Paul 
Elms and Tim Daggett. 




28 



sBest Season Since 1961 








Warren Messeck 




The team 


at the TJniver 


Warren 


Messeck and Bill 








Graves 












1966 SCHEDULE 






-at Belchertown 




+at Williamsburg 






Belchertown 


Williamsburg 


Belchertown 


W 


illiamsburg 


2 


1 W. Messeck 


S 




1 W. Messeck 


9 


3 


9 




2 W. Graves 


10 


4 


10 




3 D. Graves 


11 


5 


11 




4 J. Taylor 


12 


6 


12 




5 P. Gorham 


44 


19 


50 




15 


at Holyoke 




at Greenfield 






Holyoke 


Williamsburg 


Greenfield 


W 


lliamsburg 


2 


1 W. Messi 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


3 


6 W. Graves 


3 




4 J. Taylor 


4 


7 J. Taylor 


8 




5 W. Graves 


5 


S D. Grave: 


11 




6 D. Graves 


11 


9 P. Corhar-. 


12 




7 A. Golash 


25 


31 


36 




23 


at Williamsburg 




at Williamsburg 






Turners Falls 


Williamsburg 


Northampton 


w 


illiamsburg 


2 


1 W. .Messeck 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


3 


7 J. Taylor 


6 




3 W. Graves 


5 


8 W. Graves 


7 




4 D. Graves 


7 


10 P. Gorham 


10 




5 J. Taylor 


8 


12 D. Graves 


12 




8 P. Gorham 


25 


38 


37 




21 


at Amherst 










Amherst 


Williamsburg 


t i ' '.' nisburg 






2 


1 W. Messeck 


Pioneer 


Williamsburg 


3 


4 W. Graves 


1 




2 W. Messeck 


4 


6 J. Taylor 


4 




3 W. Graves 


5 


9 D. Graves 


10 




5 D. Graves 


6 


12 P. Gorham 


11 




6 P. Gorham 


20 


32 


12 




7 J. Taylor 


at Williamsburg 




38 




23 


Frontier 
6 


Williamsburg 

1 VV. Messeck 


at Arms 
Arms 


Williamsburc 


8 


. Graves 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


10 
11 
12 
47 


3 D. Graves 

4 J. Taylor 

5 P. Gorham 
15 


6 
7 
8 
9 




3 W. Graves 

4 D. Graves 

5 P. Gorham 
10 J. Tavlor 


■ Independent 




32 




23 






Varsity Boys Have Close Season 




FIRST ROW: Peter Golash, Robert Wilson, Alan Golash, Ahmed Sofi, Michael Eaton. SECOND ROW: Manager 
Brian Rapalee, Wayne Beebe, Warren Messeck, Lawrence West, Richard Hillenbrand, David Dewey, Manager 
Robert Beebe. 



Varsity Basketball Scores --Boys 
(11-10 Record) 
Williamsburg Opponent 



66 


Clarke School 


39 


79 


Chester 


32 


46 


Sanderson Academy 


61 


71 


Holyoke Trade 


32 


66 


Southwick 


55 


51 


Smith School 


77 


49 


Westfield Trade 


45 


39 


Gateway 


44 


53 


St. Mary's 


57 


48 


Somers 


58 


62 


Granby 


50 


80 


Charlemont 


60 


76 


Holyoke Trade 


24 


70 


Southwick 


74 


81 


Smith School 


68 


56 


Westfield Trade 


39 


58 


Gateway 


61 


54 


St. Mary's 


59 


64 


Somers 


90 


46 


Granby 


50 


49 


Deerfield Academy 






J.v. 


27 




Players 

Hillenbrand 

West 

Graves 

Messeck 

Golash A. 

Beebe 

Wilson 

Dewey 

Sofi 

Golash P. 

Eaton 

Lavalle 



1966-67 Varsity 
Foul Foul Rebounds Personals 
Shots Shots Att. 



134 

136 

102 

75 

34 

10 

8 

4 

5 

2 

1 





50 

30 

50 

26 

13 

6 

7 

6 

2 

3 







97 

57 

93 

55 

29 

9 

15 

7 

5 

5 

1 





206 

173 

137 

214 

43 

58 

3 

14 

7 

4 

2 

1 



49 
45 
52 
39 
58 
19 
6 

10 
4 
4 
2 




318 

302 

254 

176 

81 

26 

23 

14 

12 

7 

2 





575 

552 

583 

562 

553 

143 

107 

30 

27 

34 

30 

4 



Totals 



511 
1279 



193 



373 



862 



2SS 



1215 3200 



Opponent 



437 
1232 



201 



399 



781 



292 



1075 3200 



As of 20 games 



Won 10 



Lost 10 



30 



Junior Varsity Boys Achieve I 5-3 Record 




FIRST ROW: Ronald Bachand, James Vile, Thomas Hillenbrand. SECOND 
ROW: John Dufresne, Paul Elmes, George Lavalle, James Taylor. THIRD 
ROW: Richard Hutchins, David Graves, James Cernak, David Bachand. 



Players Ba: 


>kets 


Foul S 


Dewey 


89 


45 


Graves, D. 


3 


6 


Lavalle 


35 


14 


Bachand, D. 


19 


9 


Dufresne 


36 


19 


Vile, J. 


9 


11 


Hutchins 


47 


13 


Elmes 


7 


7 


Hillenbrand, T. 


7 


2 


Taylor, J. 


7 


3 


Cernak 


51 


25 


Bachand, R. 


4 


6 


Golash, P. 


14 


9 


Wilson, R. 


50 


22 



1966-67 Jr. Varsity 

hots Foul Shots A tt. Personals Total Pts. 



TOTALS 378 191 

OPPONENT 237 135 
As of 18 games Won 15 



76 


34 


223 


22 


10 


12 


28 


12 




27 


15 




38 


33 


91 


16 





29 


22 


31 


107 


13 


14 




4 


6 




15 


11 


17 


63 


32 


127 


13 


11 


14 


17 


22 


37 


41 


13 


125 


387 


241 


947 


332 


273 


609 


Lost 3 







Junior Varsity Basketball Scores 
Boys (15-3 Record) 
Williamsburg Opponent 



3 



75 


Chester 


18 


73 


Sanderson 


38 


50 


Intramural All- 






Stars 


24 


40 


Southwick 


44 


70 


Westfie]d Trade 


40 


27 


Gateway 


26 


50 


St. Mary's 


41 


45 


Somers 


44 


43 


Granby 


20 


45 


Charlemont 


21 


54 


Smith School 


61 


41 


Southwick 


42 


45 


Intramural All- 






Stars 


19 


72 


Westfield Trade 


43 


44 


Gateway 


27 


62 


St. Mary's 


43 


60 


Somers 


28 


51 


Granby 


32 



31 



Cheerleaders Promote School Spirit 




FIRST ROW: Charlene Sylvester, Kathleen Frost, Cynthia Blanchet. 
SECOND ROW: Joanne Lawler, Cheryl Tiley. THIRD ROW: Barbara 
Turner, Lynda Childs. FOURTH ROW: Constance Sarafin. 



Basketball games would be lifeless without the cheerleaders . These girls devote 
many hours to practicing and perfecting new cheers and pom-pom routines. 
Through their hard work, the cheerleaders have developed a spirited squad of 
which Williamsburg High School can be proud. 




FIRSI ROW: Beverly Parsons, Joan Gagnon, Susan Sylvester. SECOND ROW: 
Charlene Parrow, Susan Kellogg. THIRD ROW: Irene Culver, Nancy Turner, 
Amy Rapalee, Elizabeth Beauprc. 



32 



Golf Team Shows Considerable Golfing Maturity 




FIRST ROW: Ronald Bachand, Michael Pelissier, Thomas Pelissier. SECOND 
ROW: Thomas Vachula, David Bachand, David Matuewezski, David Stone. 



This was only the second year that the Golf Team 
was in existence . Although the team was young 
in both age and experience, they showed consid- 
erable golfing maturity . It is expected that the 
team will give Williamsburg High School a fine 
name as a formidable golfing competitor . 





GOLF 




SCHOOL WILLIAMSRi 'RO 


OPPONENT 


At Southwick 


4 


14 


Smith Academy 


10 





Gateway 


7 1/2 


10 1/2 


At Smith Academy 


10 





At Easthampton 


4 


8 


Easthampton 


7 1/2 


4 1/2 


At Gateway 


4 1/2 


13 1/2 


TOTAL WON- -3 






LOST --4 








Ronald Bachand shines up his golf clubs in 
eager anticipation of spring. 



33 



Baseball Team Has Successful Season 











i 



FIRST ROW: James Taylor, William Graves, Donald Gray, Anthony Seymour, Roger Clark, George LaValley, 
John Dufresne, Robert Wilson, and Michael Eaton. SECOND ROW: Captain Kenneth Stone, John Bisbee, Edwartl 
Skwira, Robert Otis, Coach Earl Tonet, Wayne Beebe, Timothy Daggett, James Brown, and Charles Norris. 
Absent: David Dewey 



Player 


AB 




P 




H 


RBI 


PO 




A 


E 


HP 


BB 


SO 


SAC 


AVE. 




Wilson 


43 




8 




16 


16 


25 




20 


12 





6 


13 


3 


.375 




Otis 


43 




11 




16 


5 


7 




1 








11 


6 





.375 




Bisbee 


42 




13 




13 


6 


6 







2 


1 


9 


6 





.306 




Graves 


47 




15 




13 


13 


7 




9 


13 


1 


9 


12 


1 


.277 




Stone 


43 




6 




10 


7 


10 




26 


7 





8 


13 





.233 




S eymour 


42 




11 




9 


3 


11 







2 


6 


8 


13 





.214 




Daggett 


11 




1 




2 





26 




1 


3 


1 


1 


8 





. 182 




Eaton 


47 




2 




6 


2 


123 




18 


8 





5 


14 


1 


. 128 




Beebe 


40 




5 




5 


6 


8 




31 


2 


1 


9 


17 


1 


.125 




LaValle 


8 









1 



















1 


2 





.125 




Brown 


20 




4 




2 


1 


66 




2 


4 


1 


6 


7 





. 100 




Dewey 


1 









1 



















1 








1.000 




Linscott 


1 




1 



























1 





.000 




Gray 


1 
































1 





.000 






































Totals 


389 




78 




94 


59 


289 




107 


54 


11 


74 


113 


6 


.241 




Pitching R 


e cords 
































Pitcher 


IP 


Runs 


Hits 


SO 


BB 


Won ] 


„ost 


ER 


ERA 














be 


66 


36 




41 


82 


26 


6 


4 


7 


.74 














Stone 


31 


22 




24 


44 


10 


2 


2 


10 


2.26 














Totals 


97 


58 




65 


126 


36 


8 


6 


17 


1. 13 




No Hitters 


































Holyoke Trade 






5 - 


8 
























Westfield Trade 






2 - 


1 

























34 



Softball Teams Wins 4, Loses 2 




■ FIRST ROW: Susan Sylvester, Nancy Turner, Judy Connell, Janice Donovan, Beverly Parsons, Irene Lindemann. 
' SECOND ROW: Judy Banister, Marsha Skvvira, Gloria Rapalee, Margaret Clark, Susan Otis, Susan Healy, Dale 
I Dextraze, Joanne Healy, Lianne Cone. THIRD ROW: Denise Bickford, Madelyn Breen, Dorothy Sylvester, Jean 
Pomeroy, Sandra Pegg, Susan Kellogg, Gloria Bushee, Sydney Williston. 



Judy Connell winds up for the pitch. 



**"" 





Softball 






Williamsburg 


Opponenl 


At Sanderson 


13 





Charlemont 


16 


19 


At Northampton 


10 


14 


Sanderson 


38 


11 


At Charlemont 


26 


6 


Northampton 


14 


11 





35 



Science Club and Glee Club Provide Opportunities for Enrichment 



The Science Club was 
reorganized this year 
under the direction of 
Mr. George Munroe 
and Mr. James Choate, 
faculty advisors. The 
club offers opportuni- 
ties for further study 
and research in the 
field of science for 
interested students. 
Members working on 
individual projects 
receive qualified ad- 
vice and are allowed 
to use all laboratory 
facilities. Science 
films and field trips 
are also offered. On 
the agenda is a field 
trip to the Yankee 

Atomic Plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. Tentatively scheduled are trips to Pro- 
phy-lac-tic Brush Company in Florence, Massachusetts, or to Stanley Home Products 
in Easthampton, Massachusetts. 




Members of the Science Club are Paula Pavelcsyk, William Brown, Gilbert 
Christopher, James Brisbois, Judy Connell, and Brian Rapalee. 



The Glee Club gives 
students with an in- 
terest in music the 
chance to take part in 
group singing. Under 
the direction of Mrs. 
Roberta Cowell, this 
choral group entertains 
the student body at 
many assemblies, 
leads the carol singing 
at the Christmas as- 
sembly, and provides 
the music at gradua- 
tion. 



^ 4 r ~i H 







I 



I 

i 



Members of the Glee Club are: SEATED: Kathleen Bisbee. FIRST ROW: Linda 
Rhoades, Carla Barrett, Mary Allen, Sylvia Shea, JoAnn Cumm, Susan 
Brown, Amy Rapalee, Tracy Putnam, Carolyn Judd, Susan Rocheleau, Judy 
Connell, Sylvia Culver, Michael Harry, Hans Weit, Brian Rapalee, John 
Clark, David Shea. SECOND ROW: Kathleen Brunner, Amy Edwards, Linda 
Munson, Deborah Montague, Sandy Graves, Betsy Feiker, Kathleen Mougin, 
Lucille Russell, Cynthia Davidson, Larry West. 



36 



INDIVIDUALS 







Outstanding Student:' 




Model Congress delegates are Gilbert Christopher, Cynthia Davidson, 
Betsy Feiker, and James Edwards. 

Each year several students are given the opportunity to learn more about their gov- 
ernment as delegates to the annual Model Congress or as a Student Government Day 
representative. The Twenty -seventh Annual Model Congress was held at American 
International College at Springfield on March 31 and April 1, 1967. The Model Con- 
gress is designed to simulate conditions as they exist in American legislature. The 
students attending submit their bills, discuss and amend them in legislative commit- 
tees, and later debate them on the floors of the Senate and House of Representatives 
where a final vote is taken. The Williamsburgh High School delegates this year are 
Cynthia Davidson, James Edwards, Betsy Feiker, and Gilbert Christopher. These 
delegates probed the efficiency of all the government spending committees now in 
operation. At the Model Congress, the delegates introduced a bill to establish a com- 
mittee to eliminate unnecessary federal spending, thus preventing any deficit increase 
in government spending. 

Curtis Mercier was selected by Princi- 
pal Paul R. Knight to represent Wil- 
liamsburg High School at the Twentieth 
Annual Student Government Day held on 
April 7, 1967. The representatives con- 
duct proceedings in the same manner as 
the General Court. Names are drawn 
from the Governor's Glass Bowl to se- 
lect Massachusetts executives such as 
Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attor- 
ney General, Senators, Representatives, 
and various legislative committees. 
These committees hear proposed bills 
in the morning, prior to afternoon de- 
c . , . r. „ ~ . _ _. ,, bate in the House and Senate Sessions. 

Student Government Day representative is Curtis Mercier. 




38 






/in Recognition 




Judy Banister is winner of the Betty Crocker Award. 



Two awards are given each year to outstanding senior girls at Williamsburgh High 
School. One of these is for proficiency in homemaking--the Betty Crocker Award; 
the other is for excellence in citizenship- -the D.A.R. Good Citizenship Award. On 
December 6, 1966, senior girls at Williamsburgh High School took an examination 
as part of General Mills' Betty Crocker Search for Scholarship program. This test 
probes the basic domestic skills and academic achievement of these girls. By ad- 
ministering this test, General Mills seeks to give young women a deeper appreciation 
and understanding of the American home. Judy Banister, as high scorer in the test, 
becomes Williamsburg High School's Homemaker of Tomorrow, and receives a charm 
to signify her achievement . 



The D.A.R. Good Citizenship Award is presented to a senior girl of outstanding 

character. The senior students first select 

by vote three girls who exhibit salient traits 

of dependability, service, leadership, and 

patriotism. From these three girls the high 

school faculty selects one who becomes Good 

Citizen for her school. This year's Good 

Citizen is Rebecca Ells. 




D. A. R. Good Citizen is Rebecca Ells. 



39 






Freshman an4f' 



FRONT ROW: Terri Deyette, Carol Jenkins, Sandra Graves, Marie Durant, 
Eileen Loud, Diane Dextraze, Caroline Madison, Betsy Feiker. SECOND 
ROW: Steven Healy, John Kroll, Richard Loomis, James Edwards, Daniel 
McCarthy, Wayne Heideman, John Dufresne. THIRD ROW: Timothy Mc- 
Carthy, Dennis Leamy, Douglas Johnson, Dennis LaValley, Thomas Hillen- 
brand, Richard Hutchins, Paul Elmes. 








FIRST ROW: Grace Bigelovj 
Cynthia Buzzee, Gloria Be- 
noit, Deborah Church, 
Deborah Cranston, Nan 
Christenson. SECOND ROW 
Daniel Boyer, Carrie 
Crampton, Cynthia David 
son, Terry Browne, Mary 
Delisle, Steve Brown. THII 
ROW: Ronald Bachand, 
Myron Clapp, Kenneth 
Chi Ids, Gilbert Christopher 
Gary Bisbee, Gary Carver, 
Wayne Cernak. 






FIRST ROW: Sandra Pittsinger, Sylvia Shea, Deborah Montague, Evalene 
Stout, Joyce Pash, Kathleen Mougin, Maureen Roberts, Bonnie Mercier. 
SECOND ROW: Patrica Tiley, Susan Sylvester, Patricia Watling, Amy 
Rapalee, Nancy Turner, Beverly Parsons, Nancy Loud, MaryLou Sander- 
son, Barbara Sarafin, Hope Vogel. THIRD ROW: Brian Thackary, John 
Nute, John Otis, James Vile, Jonathan Montague, Richard Witheral, James 
Ross, Charles Parsons, William Packard, David McCutcheon. 



3 
lUa 




3ii liophomore Classes 

* mo 




FIRST ROW: Joyce Fountain, Marlene Adair, Lucille Kelly, Christine Allen, 
Susan Kellogg, Michal Brown, Irene Culver, Judith Connell, Barbara Holy- 
royd, Medora Clifford. SECOND ROW: JoAnne Healy, Mary Inge His, Peter 
Golash, Herbert Hale, Timothy Daggett, Donald Gray, Thomas Jenkins, 
Lannie Cone, Elaine Clark, Dale Dextraze. THIRD ROW: Raryn Bauver, 
Allen LePalm, Dennis Lake, Robert Beebe, Leo Aloisi, Lynn Harry, George 
LaVallee, David Bachand. David Graves, Joseph Desmarais, Elizabeth Hull. 




FIRST ROW: Joelle O'Brien, Marilyn Messeck, Suzanne Rocheleau, Diane 
Warner, Charlene Parrow, Eleanor Thibault, Kathleen Malone, Jean Pome- 
roy, Nancy Pittsinger. SECOND ROW: Thomas Pelissier, Edward Parsons, 
Kenneth Parsons, Victor Wilson, Arthur Smith, Brian Rapalee, Gary Moran, 
David Matuewezski, Douglas Vile. THIRD ROW: William Lockwood, Robert 
Pomeroy, William Shaw, Edward Skwira, Thomas Vachula, Paul Sanderson, 
Richard Turner, Charles Norris, Robert Scott. 




41 



Juniors 




FIRST ROW: Katharine King, Constance Sarafin, Cheryl Tiley, Joanne Lawler, Eileen Quigley, Lindsay Mosher, 
Paula Pavelcsyk, Cynthia Stone, Carolyn Judd, Joy Martin, and Sandra Pegg. SECOND ROW: Charlene Sylvester, 
Michael Pelissier, Henry Nietsche, David Stone, Paul Howes, Robert Rocheleau, Robert Wilson, and Ann Kel- 
logg. THIRD ROW: Patricia Warner, Edwin Webb, Donna Thackeray, James O'Brien. Roy LaValley, Mahlon 
Parsons, Paul Hathaway, Larry West, Alan Loughnan, Mark Johnson, Kenneth Taylor, Warren Messeck, Jean 
Rustemeyer, and Sharon Loom is. 



42 



Seniors 




When seniors are measured for caps and gowns, they realize that soon they 
will pass through the doors of Williamsburg High School for the last time. 



43 




JUDITH WELLS BANISTER 
Basketball 1,2, 3,4; Drill Team 1, 
2; Glee Club lj Softball 2,3; Co- 
captain 4. 




RITA ROSE BALISE 
Chorus 3; Dramatics 3,4; Glee 
Club 1. 



DAVID ROBERT BEAUDOIN 
Glee Club 1; Treasurer 4. 





I 



ALAN HAROLD ADAIR 



WAYNE ROBERT BEEBE 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, Co-captain 4; 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1. 




This page is made possible through the contribution of 
GRAVES EQUIPMENT 

44 




KATHLEEN ELLA BISBEE 
Basketball Manager 2,3,4; Chorus 
3,4; Glee Club 1,2; Tattler Staff 
4. 



LYNDA LOUISE CHILDS 
Cheerleader 1,2,3,4; Chorus 3; 
Glee Club 1; Secretary 1; Treas- 
urer 3. 











JAMES ERNEST BRISBOIS 
Audio-visual Aide 2, 3; Assistant 
Instructor 4. 



NANCY DIANE BUFFUM 
Drill Team 1,2; Highlight Staff 2. 





CAREY BATEMAN BROWN 



45 





JANE ELLEN CLARK 
Drill Team 1. 




MARGARET LOUISE CLARK 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Drill Team 
2; Softball 1,2,3, Co-captain 4. 



SYLVIA JEAN CULVER 
Basketball 1,2,3, Co-captain 4; 
Chorus 3,4; Glee Club 1; Press 
Club 3,4; Secretary 4; Student 
Council Vice-president 4; Vice- 
president 2. 



ALFRED GEORGE CONE 
Baseball Manager 2; Basketball 2, 
3; Cross Country Manager 3; Sci- 
ence Club 2; Student Council 2,3, 
4. 




DOUGLAS CLARKE DURHAM 
Debating 1; Dramatics Staff 2,3, 
4; Student Guide 4; Science Club 
2,3; Tattler Staff 4. 



46 





MICHAEL EATON 
Baseball 1,2, 3, Co-captain 4; 
Basketball 3,4. 




LINDA ELLEN ELDRED 
Drill Team 2. 




DOUGLAS PERRY FERRANTE 
Vice-President 4. 



KATHLEEN RUTH FROST 
Cheerleader 1,2,3, Captain 4; 
Dramatics Staff 1,3; Highlight 
Staff 2; Student Council 2,3; Tat- 
tler Staff 4. 





REBECCA LOUISE ELLS 
Cheerleader 1,3, Co-captain 2; 
Dramatics Staff 1,2,3,4; Glee 
Club 1; Historian 1,4; National 
Honor Society 3,4; Press Club 2, 
3; Secretary 2,3; Student Council 
Secretary 2,3; Tattler Editor 4. 



47 




ROBERT LOUIS HATHAWAY 
Dramatics 2,3; Glee Club 1; Sci- 
ence Club 1 . 





BARBARA ROSE KAJKA 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Chorus 3; Drill 
Team 1,2. 



EDWARD JOSEPH McCABE 
Audio-visual Aide 2, 3, 4; Drama- 
tics 3; Science Club 2,3; Tattler 
Sports Editor 4; Student Guide 4; 
Tattler Staff 3; Vice-president 3. 






GERALD DOUGLAS LASHWAY 



JAMES LEBEAU 
Dramatics 2; Student Guide 3; Vice- 
president 1 . 





STEPHEN LEADORE LA VALLEY 
Glee Club 2; Science Club 4. 



49 






h 




DELPHINE ANN McDONOUGH 
Drill Team 1,2; Glee Club 1; Hi; 
light Staff 2. 




MARILYN LEIGH MENARD 
Basketball 1,2,3, Co-captain 4; 
Drill Team 2; Glee Club 1; Tattler 
Staff 4. 




CURTIS ROGER MERCIER 
Cross Country 3; Dramatics 4; 
Debating 4; Glee Club 1; National 
Honor Society 3,4; President 3,4; 
Student Council President 4; Stu- 
dent Guide 3,4; Tattler Staff Man- 
ager 4. 



PETER EDWARD MONTAGUE 
Basketball 3; Student Guide 4. 




WALTER HOWARD MORREY 




50 




LINDA SUSAN MUNSON 

National Honor So- 
ciety 3, 4. 



Glee Club 1,2 




EVELYN GRACE NEWCOMB 
Glee Club 1. 



GLORIA BETH RAPALEE 
Basketball 2,3,4; Highlight Staff 1; 
National Honor Society 3,4; Press 
Club 3; Science Club 3; Softball 2, 
3,4; Tattler Staff 4. 



LUCILLE ALICE RUSSELL 
Dramatics Staff 4; Glee Club 1,2, 
3, 4; Library Aide 2, 3, 4; National 
Honor Society 3,4; Tattler Staff 4. 





51 




MARSHA THERESA SKWIRA 
Drill Team 1,2; Glee Club 1; 
Historian 2; National Honor So- 
ciety 3,4; Softball 2,3,4; Tattler 
Staff 4. 




ANTHONY DONALD SEYMOUR 
Baseball 1,2,3,4; Cross Country 2. 



LINDA JEAN SLAVAS 








PHILIP WILLIAM RUSSELL 
Glee Club 1. 



CORY LEE STOUT 
Glee Club 1; Science Club 1,4; 
National Honor Society 3,4; Tat- 
tler Staff 4. 




52 




CARLA JOAN SWANDA 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Drill Team 2; 
Glee Club 1,3; Highlight Staff 2; 
Historian 3 . 



JAMES F. WELLS 
Glee Club 1. 




te^ j#: 





BARBARA LOU TURNER 
Cheerleader 3,4; Co-captain 2; 
Dramatics Staff 1,2,3,4; Glee 
Club 1; Highlight Staff 1,2; Stu- 
dent Council 4; Tattler Staff 4. 





PETER GRAY WARREN 
Debating 1; Science Club 2. 



PHILIP OTIS WEBB 
Science Club 1; Tattler Assistant 
Editor 4. 



53 





MOULAY AHMED SOFI 
Basketball 4; Cross Country 4. 



HANS JOACHIM WEIT 




OUR SENIOR CLASS 
ADVISORS 




Mrs. Bart 



Mr. Munroe 




Senior class officers are Curtis Mercier, David Beaudoin, Rebecca Ells, 
Douglas Ferrante, and Sylvia Culver. 



54 



Faculty Sees Many Changes 



This year at Williamsburg High School has 
been a very unusual one because of the 
many changes that were made in the 
faculty. 

Mr. Reddington, who had been our super in - 
tendant for the past ten years, left, and 
Mr. Buss, our principal for the last four 
years, was promoted to Mr. Reddington 's 
previous office. As a favor to the school 
and the town of Williamsburg, Mr. Tonet 
acted as principal until the school com- 
mittee could appoint a permanent principal. 

In the first part of November, Mr. Knight, 
a former member of the mathematics de- 
partment, was ap- 
pointed principal . Mr-. 
Tonet then went back 
to his coaching and 
teaching. Both faculty 
and students are to be 
commended for their 
effort in keeping things 
running smoothly 
during this period. 




Mrs. Ann Graves, 
Secretary 





Mr. George Feiker, 
Guidance Director 



Mr. Earl Tonet, 
Vice Principal 



55 




History Department: 
Mrs. Marjorie Mc- 
Kusick, Mr. Herbert 
Montebello 




Mr. Earl Tonet 




Music Department: 
Mrs. Roberta Cowell 



Math* 

Mr. Bernard 

Mrs. Fj 




Physical Education Department: 

Mrs. Evelyn Kmit, Mr. David Grills, Mr. Earl Tonet 




Sci- 
Mr. George Mo • 



Mr. G 



• 



56 




ent: 

jert Branch, 




Language Department: 
Mr. Arnold Matz, Mrs. 
Marjorie McKusick, 
Mrs. Hilda DeNood 



Mr. Earl Tonet 




Commercial Department: 

Mrs. Eleanor Bart, Mrs. Frances Grinnell 




..Mr. Bernard Tobin 




Went: 

TBDavid Wyman 



English Department: 

Mrs. Marie Packard, Mrs. Barbara Gervais, Mrs. 

Margaret Halberstadt 



57 







IAMSBUR' 



Bill's Hair. 

ray's Service 

Jrowjn's Sod a S 

C£rfffetia"Stt« 

My£on Clark, JkaJdin 
: Culver Real iM.iic 
V. H. Gra\ 

ningway Imuranee. Com pa 
Dr. Ruth Hemingv 
Hosier 1 ! je Store 

Lumber 

I UlK'll I'.ox 
id Mrs. Leslie Packard 
Shop 
u'lsi^l's Re5Ttstale 



iutTa< 



>mpany 



liamaburg Fuel Company 
liamsbijrg Insusauce Gompan 

aisburg Pharmacy 
liamsfcupg Sn*ek Bar ■ 



twiaivs variety Market 
Chuck's Radio 
Ferrantc Company 
'RhydenyilleJPackage S 
I laydenville Savii 
Hil'lsid, 











*143 




CNESTEIFIEU 6 1 GOSHEN 5 
■MTNM6T0N 12 D ALTON 30 




CHESTERFIELD 

Bisbee Brothers 
Charles Bisbee, Jr. 
Blueridge Blueberry Farm 
Mr. and Mrs.. Forrest Curtis 
The Electronic Shop 
Fred Healy, Jr. 
Healy's Garage 

GOSHEN 

Hillwood Farm 



* George D. Judd 
LaTourette's Restaurant 

WORTHING TON 

Dr. John E. Mode stow 
** Hampshire Service & Transportation 
Corporation 

Regular Contribution $5 

* Contributed $10 
** Contributed $15 




FLORENCE 

Betty's Beauty Salon 

Breguet's Service Station 

Cooper's Dairy 

Florence Texaco 

Gray's Market 

Keyes' Flower Shop 

Mad Hatter 

Murduff's Jewelry Store 

Paddock's Cleaners and Tailors 

West Clothing Store 

LEEDS 

Look Restaurant 

NORTHAMPTON 



Ann August 

Bailey -Doane Insurance Agency 

Basile's T.V. and Music Shop 

Bon Marche 

Cahill & Hodges 

Carlson's 

H. L. Childs & Sons 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 

Cohen Brothers 

Harry Daniels Inc. 

E. & J. Cigar Company Inc. 

Fine 's Store 

Foster -Farrar Company 

#** Graves Equipment 



Hampshire Supply Company 
Harlow Luggage 
King & Cushman Inc. 
Labbee Chevrolet 
MacDonald's Shoe Shop 

* Paul Mann 
**Moggio & Conz 

Nelson's Menswear 

Northampton Radiator Company Inc. 

Northampton Wrecking Company 

Parson's Electric Shop Inc. 

Dr. Henry J. Philie, Jr. 

* Pleasant Market 
Pleasant Street Pharmacy 
Purseglove's 

Quill, Inc. 

Rose's Delicatessen 

Sherman Jewelers 

Ted's Boot Shop 

Helen Todd 

Tripod Camera Shop Inc. 

Typewriter Shop 

Radio Station WHMP 

Wood & Strand 



WESTHAMPTON 

Loudville Store 

Lyman Manufacturing, Inc. 

Regular Contribution $5 
* Contributed $10 
** Contributed $15 
***Full Page $25